Wednesday, December 18, 2019

The Classics Club III


Previous lists:

The Classics Club List I March 2012 to December 2015 Total: 75 classics

The Classics Club List II January 2016 to December 2019 Total: 50 classics

Now it is time for a third challenge. 

Presenting...

The Classics Club List III
Begin January 2020
End December 2024
Total 60 

FICTION

Hardy: 
A Pair of Blue Eyes (1873)
The Trumpet Major (1880)

Lewis: 
Babbit (1922) 

Haley: 
Roots (1976)

Hemingway: 
For Whom the Bell Tolls (1940)

Hugo:
The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1831)
Les Misérables (1862)

Scott:
Ivanhoe (1819)

Morrison: 
The Bluest Eye (1970)

Tennyson:
Idylls of the King (1859-1885)

Verne: 

White:
The Once and Future King (1958)

Twain: 
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884) (reread) [reading]
Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc (1896)
The Prince and the Pauper (1881) (reread, I think)

Austen: 
Sanditon, The Watsons, and Lady Susan (1870s)

Lawrence:
Sons and Lovers (1913)

Marquez: 

Malory:
Le Morte d'Arthur, Vol. 1 (1485)

Bédier:
The Romance of Tristan and Iseult (12th c.)

Eliot: 
Middlemarch (1871)

Irving: 
Old Christmas (1876)

Somerset: 
Of Human Bondage (1915)

James: 
The Turn of the Screw (1898) (reread, maybe?)

Faulkner: 
The Sound and the Fury (1929)

Collins: 
The Woman in White (1859)

Gaskell: 
Mary Barton (1848)

Achebe: 
Things Fall Apart (1958)

Steinbeck: 
To a God Unknown (1933)

Angelou: 
I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings (1969)

Stone:
Love is Eternal (1954)

Sinclair: 
The Jungle (1905)

Adams:

Dickens:
Bleak House 
David Copperfield

Sinclair:
The Jungle (1906)

Rand:
Atlas Shrugged (1957)

Doyle:
The Complete Sherlock Holmes, vol. II (1880s)
The Sherlock Holmes Mysteries (1880s)

Mann:
The Magic Mountain (1924)

NON-FICTION

Adler/VanDoren:

Brown: 

Equiano: 

Galbraith:

Twain: 
The Innocents Abroad (1869)
Roughing It (1872)

Eastman: 
Indian Boyhood (1902) (reread)

Friedan: 

Orwell:

Polo: 
The Travels of Marco Polo (13th c.)

Douglass: 
My Bondage and My Freedom (1855)

Wells:

Brittain:

Austen:
The History of England (1791)

PLAYS

Shakespeare: 

Hamlet (1603)
Romeo and Juliet (1595-97?)
The Taming of the Shrew (1590-92?)

20 comments:

  1. Love it! I see some friends, and some that I'm also intending to read.

    I think it's very doable in 5 years, -maybe earlier-, even if you deviate a bit from it with other classics and not all listed.

    I'm more and more looking forward to our read along!

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  2. Ooo, great list but interesting. You've included some authors I like taking in very, very small doses like Maugham and Faulkner. Also some newer books which surprisingly fit into the 50 year rule. I'll be watching to see how you get along with these. I hope you don't mind being a guinea pig for my reading, lol! If you like it, I probably will!

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  3. Congrats on starting your 3rd list! You have some of my favorites in here, like The Heart is a Lonely Hunter

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  4. Mad respect to see this. I am about to finish my first Classics Club list this year. Congratulations on round 3!

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  5. Great list! I see some favorites and some things I don't know well. You'll enjoy it!

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  6. What a great list you've made. I love Middlemarch and Mary Barton, and plan to read Bleak House over the coming year too. It'll be a re-read for me, but I don't remember much about it. Watership Down is a treasure too! I'll look forward to your thoughts on all these.

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  7. Silvia....I'm a little nervous bc many of these are epics or tomes, and I've left them alone b/c I am intimidated by their size. But this time, I've got to read them, or else!

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  8. Cleo....no problem. I'll be sure to be honest about what I think.

    Yeah, I've not read some of these authors before, so I don't know what to expect.

    I wasn't sure about some of the later published books, but when I checked on The Classics Club, readers did post reviews of books published after the 60s. I know the rule has always been whatever you consider a classic, or one that will probably be considered a classic. It's very vague, I know.

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  9. Emma...thanks! I cannot wait to read The Heart is a Lonely Hunter. An author/speaker I really enjoy made a big deal about it. I'm ready to dive in.

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  10. Paula...I'm looking forward to Mary Barton and Watership Down. I'm a little intimidated by the sizes of some of these others, like Middlemarch and Bleak House! I'll need encouragement. Hey, let me know when/if you do decide to read Middlemarch. Maybe I can come along side you (or you ---> me). That always helps in the way of accountability.

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  11. Some great ones here. Looking forward to your thoughts. A few I didn't love ( I won't name them, so as not to bias you). ENJOY!

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  12. I love your list - and the dedication you've shown to be starting your third list! (I've not made it through a single list yet...oops.) I would enjoy reading from this list, though - some favorites on here (the Austen, Collins, and Marquez selections to start with). Also, I should remember to add Le Morte d'Arthur to a future version of my own list. Enjoy!

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  13. Joseph: thank you!

    Amanda: thank you. Definitely looking forward to Le Morte d'Arthur.

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  14. HUGE accomplishment. A Farewell To Arms is EXCELLENT, as is your Faulkner selection. HORRAY FOR VERA BRITTAIN. Seriously, yes! Roots, Anne Bronte, David Copperfield. YES. I'm still trying to get through a first list. :P Way to go!

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  15. Hamlette: ME? Aw, shucks! You guys all rock! I'm a flake. But thanks, honestly.

    Jillian: Oh, yay! So many on here I am EXCITED to read. I look up at them and think of the wonder. And then some I am severely intimidated. But I learned this year especially that if I have to drag my feet through another book I dislike, I am putting it down. I won't force myself. Know what I mean?

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  16. Just seeing this, Ruth. Yes, I DO know what you mean. :D

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