Tuesday, January 1, 2019

January Reading Stack


Happy New Year! 

In 2019, I plan to reread a lot. That is, I plan to revisit books that remained with me (in my heart, on my mind) long after reading them. Rereads are marked with an asterisk. This is what I am beginning in January:

Common Sense* ~Thomas Paine [Well-Educated Mind Histories, The Classics Club II]
In my quest to get educated, I bought this copy of Thomas Paine's writings, and I read all of it. That was back in 2005, I think. TWEM requires readers to read only Common Sense, and that is where I am now in the list of histories.

The Hiding Place* ~ Corrie Ten Boom [Christian Greats Challenge]
This was suggested to me by a friend, and I read this in 2008. This is an amazing story about a great Christian woman, which is why I am reading it for the CGC.

Twelfth Night ~ Shakespeare [The Classics Club II]
A new endeavor...I am reading Shakespeare with my kids in the original language. Each play takes us about three months to complete. I might as well add them to my Classics Club TBR.

The Age of Innocence* ~ Edith Wharton [Back to the Classics: place I have lived]
I read this in 2014, and I enjoyed it very much. The film was worthy, too. Adding this to my B2CC under places I have lived because it is set in New York City, where I am originally from.

11 comments:

  1. I'm only about half-way through The Age of Innocence, so there you go, we can read together! Have fun with Common Sense ... that's one I've not been looking forward to. Well, right now I'm going for a walk and then I'm going to settle down today and read! Fun! :-)

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    1. OK, I'll try and catch up to you. I'm a couple of chapters in already. I forgot how much I enjoyed it.

      It's funny that many years ago I was eager to read CS; and I thought it was excellent (all of it, except Paine's lecture on Christianity). Now, in 2019, my opinions have soured so much on politics and government that I find that reading it now I am lukewarm about it. We'll see how it turns out in the end.

      Walking sounds like a good idea. I bet it's chilly where you are. (It has dropped into the 20s here, and we're all freaking out...afraid to go outside for 2 minutes!)

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  2. I had planned to finally read The Social Contract, but it might be easier to just join in for Common Sense first and then read The Social Contract.

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    1. No problem. I get the feeling Thomas Paine mimicked Rousseau's ideas. I could be wrong, but a few pages in, there are already a lot of similarities.

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  3. Thomas Paine scares me - should I be scared? :)

    Twelfth Night's fun, I hope you enjoy it!

    By the way, if you're interested, I found a book you might possibly want to check out (I've not read it myself, mind, but I intend to) - Lives of Roman Christian Women published by Penguin in 2010 - https://www.penguin.co.uk/books/604/60436/lives-of-roman-christian-women/9780141441931.html

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    1. He's not intimidating at all. I'm certain you have read far more intimidating propagandists. He comes across angry, but I suppose it was a sign of his times.

      Thank you for the book suggestion. I'm going to check it out right now.

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    2. Oh, yep! I checked it out and added it to the top of my Amazon wishlist. Thanks!

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  4. Happy New Year! This is a nice plan for January. I enjoyed The Age of Innocence and Twelfth Night is one of my favorite Shakespeare plays. Happy reading!

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    1. Happy New Year! Thanks. Last term my kids and I read Macbeth, and we had no idea what was going on. I told them it was like learning a whole new language. By the end, we really got into it. My son thought HE was Macduff for awhile. Overall, they all loved reading Shakespeare. For sure, I am looking forward to a break from murder and lying and death.

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  5. I like the way you organize your books according to reading challenge!

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