Thursday, December 1, 2016

The Well-Educated Mind Histories Reading Project 2017

beginning January 2017


Are you are a history fanatic and want an excuse to read more of it, or do you loathe it terribly and need encouragement to exercise that part of your brain?  Here is an excuse or opportunity, which ever describes you best:  

Starting January, 2017, I am beginning The Well-Educated Mind "Histories," by Susan Wise Bauer.  You may read along or join in when you see a book you want to read; check out the list of books (listed in chronological order). There is a Goodreads group available, too, if you would like to follow along or add to the conversation.  Or you can post reviews on your blog as you finish a book. Whatever you decide, this is a personal learning project.  I am all for the spreading of more knowledge of history.

There are thirty-one books on the list.  I know I am crazy because this project could take over three years to complete (for me). I should also mention that I am terrified of commitment.  

Nonetheless, let us have fun reading history together!

21 comments:

Colleen Vanderlinden said...

Maybe 2017 will be the year I finally make some progress on my TWEM lists. I've been slowly but surely working through some of the fiction list, but maybe I'll take a break from that and try the histories for a while. :)

Keely said...

The list looks really interesting and I have a few titles on my Classics Club list so I may join you. I used to read a lot of non fiction history but not so much lately.

Homeschool Mom said...

This looks great. I am teaching a new course (for me) this Spring term at Truett McConnell University. The course is "Modern Europe" and I want it to center on the "Great Books" of the post-Renaissance era. Best wishes on your trek through the best books of the age as well.

cleopatra said...

I just put up my post. I can't wait to start! I'll probably spend some extra time in the first 4 or so books but then away I go! So exciting!

Risa said...

Fascinating list! Personally, I would love to read Plutarch's Lives, The Rise and Fall of the Roman Empire, and The Vindication of the Rights of Woman. I read More's Utopia ages ago...I might like to re-read him.

All the best with this list, Ruth! Am looking forward to keeping up with your thoughts on these.:D

Ruth said...

Hi, Colleen. I see you are just beginning. How exciting. I remember when I started the novel list five years ago. It was such a wonderful journey. I loved it, and there are days when I think I will just return to the novels and reread them. You are welcome to join us; Bauer says it is up to the reader to decide which genre to start with, and it is always helpful to have reading partners and encouragement. When I started TWEM, I found five other women (with blogs) who were reading through the novels, which was really nice. I also know someone who is reading through TWEM sideways - that is, she and a group of people via Goodreads, are reading through all five genres according to their publishing dates, which is also a great idea. (I wish I would have done that.)

Ruth said...

That will be great!

Ruth said...

Sounds interesting. Is it a history course, and you just use real books to teach the course, or is it English Lit?

Thanks.

Ruth said...

Thanks, Cleo. I answered you over at your blog, too.

Ruth said...

Thanks, Risa. Jump in whenever you like. : )

Carol said...

Ruth, are you planning to read them in order? There are some I'd like to read, one I've read already (Utopia)though not blogged about; have read a number of Plutarch's Lives and others I probably wouldn't touch with a ten foot pole - not because they aren't worthy, just because of the time factor mostly.

Ruth said...

Carol,
Yes, I plan to read them chronologically. You can always jump in when you see a book you want to read along with us. I know there are some that are huge, like City of God. I don't know how I'm going to finish that one. The interesting thing about Bauer's suggestion is that we are reading these histories to see how writing history has changed over time, and how each one takes from the last. She said we don't have to read every word from the author, as long as we get a sense of the history itself. So that will be interesting to see how we can manage our reading.

Anonymous said...

This sounds like a fascinating read along. I am adding it to my Challenge Directory to help spread the word.

Ruth said...

Thanks, Toady.

(P.S. I'm totally loving your site.)

Stephen said...

Best of luck to you! Herodotus and Gibbon are in my Classics club list. I'll be following your progress with great interest, as the wise chancellor Palpatine said... ;-)

Hibernators Library said...

Wow. Good luck!

Jean said...

I'm in for at least some of them! I'm not sure I can manage Gibbon, oh golly.

Carol said...

I'll attempt to join in as you go. There are some I've wanted to read but never got to. We've had the full 8 volume set of Decline & Fall (folio freebie) sitting unread on the shelf for I don't know how many years.

Ruth said...

Thank you.

Ruth said...

: D Thank you.

Ruth said...

: D (I answered you on Goodreads.)